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Principles and practical methods of curing tobacco by Garner, W. W.

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Published by Govt. Print. Off. in Washington .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Tobacco curing

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementby W. W. Garner.
SeriesUnited States. Department of Agriculture. Bureau of Plant Industry. Bulletin ;, no. 143, Bulletin (United States. Bureau of Plant Industry) ;, no. 143
Classifications
LC ClassificationsSB273 .G25
The Physical Object
Pagination54 p. :
Number of Pages54
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL234785M
LC Control Numberagr09000702
OCLC/WorldCa4919905

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texts All Books All Texts latest This Just In Smithsonian Libraries FEDLINK Principles and practical methods of curing tobacco Item Preview remove-circle Principles and practical methods of curing tobacco by Garner, W. W. (Wightman Wells), b. ; United States. Bureau of Plant Industry. Title: Principles and practical methods of curing tobacco Author: Garner W W This is an exact replica of a book. The book reprint was manually improved by a team of professionals, as opposed to automatic/ OCR processes used by some companies. However, the book may still have imperfections such as missing pages, poor pictures. English tobacco culture Growing tobacco seedlings in multipot trays Methods of testing the burning quality of cigar tobacco Pipes and tobacco Potash requirements of the tobacco crop Principles and practical methods of curing tobacco Snow's modern barn system of raising and curing tobacco The art of planting, growing, curing and handling fine. Only general principles can be discussed in the present bulletin, for the minor details, however important in the work of handling tobacco, must be mastered by actual experience, under the supervision of an expert. The following suggestions will be found to apply to widely Methods of curing tobacco., book, ; Washington D.C.

There are 3 main ways of curing tobacco. Curing methods vary with the type of tobacco grown. The tobacco barn design varies accordingly. Air-cured Tobacco Leaves Air-cured tobacco is carried out by hanging the tobacco in a well-ventilated barns, where the tobacco . Principles and practical methods of curing tobacco by W. Garner () Responses on the use of tobacco by B. Lane () Smokiana, historical & ethnographical by R. Pritchett () Smoking a world of curious facts, queer fancies, and lively anecdotes about pipes, tobacco and cigars by G. Manson () Smoking and drinking by J. Parton (). principles and practical methods of curing tobacco Responses on the use of tobacco by B. Lane () revelations about tobacco smokiana-historical and ethnographical Smoking and drinking by J. Parton () smoking-a world of curious facts about tobacco snows modern barn system of raising and curing tobacco   Well what an informative article, I tried many years ago to grow tobacco, plants grew fine but mucked up the curing process, I want to flavour the stuff for pipe smoking, I have a very large jar of glycerine in the garage could I use that with port and brandy, spray the leaf, let dry, then press and mature but for how long - best guess for a.

  INTRODUCTION In the past years many practical examinations were carried out to detennine some important technological questions, regarding to curing of tobacco. After studying the world-literature of tobacco curing, especially the publications of (Hawks () and Mohsenin (), the experimental work was planned carefully. Download PDF: Sorry, we are unable to provide the full text but you may find it at the following location(s): (external link) http. Curing with salt and sugar may be called salting, salt-curing, sugar-curing or application of pellets of salt, called corns, is often called in a water solution or brine is called wet-curing or pickling or Bertolli notes that a pickle contains nitrite in addition to salt.(Bertolli ) The curing of fish is sometimes called kippering. Tobacco is harvested either leaf by leaf, in the case of Virginia and oriental tobaccos, or by the whole plant, in the case of burley. The next stage, curing, plays a major role in defining the leaf's final quality and character. Each tobacco type is cured differently: air-curing for burley, flue-curing for Virginia, and sun-curing for oriental.